An Invisible Army

Back in May 1998, I read The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis for the first time while I was recovering from some minor surgery. Here is a brief description of this seven-volume set of books from the Narnia website:

The Chronicles of Narnia has become part of the canon of classic literature, drawing readers of all ages into magical lands with unforgettable characters for over sixty years. Epic battles between good and evil, fantastic creatures, betrayals, heroic deeds, and friendships won and lost all come together in this unforgettable world. (Quote source here.)

The main character in the “The Chronicles of Narnia” is Aslan, the Great Lion, and he is the only character to appear in all seven books in the series. Wikipedia states the following regarding Aslan:

“C.S. Lewis often capitalizes the word ‘lion’ in reference to Aslan since he parallels Jesus Christ. Aslan is also depicted as a talking lion, and is described as the King of Beasts, the son of the Emperor-Over-the-Sea, and the King above all High Kings in Narnia. Aslan is Turkish for ‘lion’.” (Quote source here.)

I mention that brief introduction to “The Chronicles of Narnia” to go along with a devotion I read two days ago in Our Daily Bread titled, The Reality of God,” by Remi Oyedele, a finance professional and freelance writer. Here is that devotion:

“The Lord opened the servant’s eyes, and he [saw] chariots of fire all around Elisha.”2 Kings 6:17

Today’s Scripture & Insight: 2 Kings 6:8–17

In C. S. Lewis’ “The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe,” all of Narnia is thrilled when the mighty lion Aslan reappears after a long absence. Their joy turns to sorrow, however, when Aslan concedes to a demand made by the evil White Witch. Faced with Aslan’s apparent defeat, the Narnians experience his power when he emits an earsplitting roar that causes the witch to flee in terror. Although all seems to have been lost, Aslan ultimately proves to be greater than the villainous witch.

Like Aslan’s followers in Lewis’ allegory, Elisha’s servant despaired when he got up one morning to see himself and Elisha surrounded by an enemy army. “Oh no, my lord! What shall we do?” he exclaimed (2 Kings 6:15). The prophet’s response was calm: “Don’t be afraid . . . . Those who are with us are more than those who are with them” (v. 16). Elisha then prayed, “Open his eyes, Lord, so that he may see” (v. 17). So, “the Lord opened the servant’s eyes, and he looked and saw the hills full of horses and chariots of fire all around Elisha” (v. 17). Although things at first seemed bleak to the servant’s eye, God’s power ultimately proved greater than the enemy horde.

Our difficult circumstances may lead us to believe all is lost, but God desires to open our eyes and reveal that He is greater. (Quote source here.)

Most of us have gone through situations or circumstances where it seems like all is lost. Time passes and nothing changes, or it gets even worse. At times like these we need an Elisha around to remind us as he reminded his servant to look to the hills (and God), and not at our circumstances. Those chariots of fire that Elisha saw were full of angels ready to defend them from the enemy horde.

In a May 2016 article titled, The Truth About Angels,” by Dr. Tony Evans, pastor, speaker, author, widely syndicated radio and television broadcaster, and founder of “The Urban Alternative,” he writes:

You might be asking yourself, “Why should I take the time to learn about angels? They have no bearing on my daily life.” Like most of us, you are likely working hard to make ends meet and to keep everything together. And if you are married or have children, your days can seem even longer and more tiring. Exhausted, you fall into bed each night, thankful that you and your loved ones made it through another day. The very thought of expending what little free time you have to study something that seems low on your list of priorities is often an easy decision: you’re too busy now, but maybe someday.…

Consider this, however: Angels may be unseen, but they are real. Everything you do, every step you take as a child of God, is controlled by, influenced by, and directed by this angelic realm. Nothing takes place in our physical world outside of this spiritual realm.

Nothing.

We are in the midst of an angelic conflict, and when we understand about angels, we begin to notice how prevalent their activities are on almost every page of the Bible. They are busy functioning and fulfilling God’s mandates. Angels are basically God’s staff, and He has chosen in His own sovereignty to accomplish His will through these intermediaries.

Probably my favorite story of angels’ protection is found in 2 Kings 6. Elisha was a prophet who kept preaching and prophesying against Israel’s enemies the Arameans. Well, the Arameans had finally had enough and they decided they needed to get rid of Elisha. Permanently. Elisha must have been a very intimidating man because they sent an entire army to surround the city of Dothan where Elisha was currently staying with his servant. The servant looked outside and saw this vast and fearsome army, and cried out in fright, “What shall we do?” (2 Kings 6:15).

Have you ever been like Elisha’s servant? You wring your hands together in worry and think the problem you are facing is just too big and you think, “What can I do?”

Elisha’s response to his frightened servant (and by association, to us as well) was classic. He said, “Do not fear, for those who are with us are more than those who are with them” (2 Kings 6:16).

That poor servant must have thought Elisha had finally cracked under the pressure because he could see no one but the enemy forces.

But let’s read on in 2 Kings 6:17 for Elisha’s response: “Then Elisha prayed and said, ‘O Lord, I pray, open his eyes that he may see.’ And the Lord opened the servant’s eyes and he saw; and behold, the mountain was full of horses and chariots of fire all around Elisha.”

The key here is that Elisha prayed. And that’s just as true for us today. God is in control and He sends His angels to protect us according to His will. Friend, be mindful of the role angels play in your life. Ask the Lord to open your eyes to His use of them, and to increase that use for His purpose, His glory, and your good. (Quote source here.)

Another devotion titled, More With Us Than Against Us,” published on JosephPrince.com on this same passage in 2 Kings states the following:

“Do not fear, for those who are with us are more than those who are with them.”2 Kings 6:16

In the days of the prophet Elisha, the king of Syria seized upon an opportunity to capture Elisha who was in the city of Dothan. He mobilized a great army with many chariots and horses to surround the city one night. He wasn’t prepared to take any risk of the prophet escaping.

Early the next morning in Dothan, when Elisha’s servant went outside, he saw troops, horses, and chariots everywhere. He and Elisha were completely surrounded by enemy forces intent on killing them. The servant flew into a state of panic and cried out to Elisha, “Alas, my master! What shall we do?” (2 Kings 6:15).

Put yourself in the shoes of Elisha’s servant. You (and I) would probably have been filled with fear too. But here’s where I want you to pay close attention, because there is a powerful truth I want you to catch. Without faltering, Elisha calmly told his servant, “Do not fear, for those who are with us are more than those who are with them” (2 Kings 6:16).

I can just imagine how the servant must have felt. There was absolutely no logic in what Elisha had just said. There were just the two of them against a whole army! Had his master gone mad?

Before the servant could work himself into an even greater panic, Elisha prayed a simple prayer: “Lord, I pray, open his eyes that he may see” (2 Kings 6:17). And the Lord opened the eyes of the servant. Then he saw that the hillside all around them was filled with blindingly magnificent horses and chariots of fire. God’s army of angels was flanking them on every side, ablaze with the glory, beauty, and majesty of the Most High. As the servant marveled, he realized that the Syrian forces were utterly dwarfed by the angelic army.

Why had the young servant been fearful while Elisha was fearless? The answer is this: They saw different things. The young man saw the great Syrian army. But Elisha saw an even greater angelic army on chariots of fire. Elisha had spiritual insight.

My dear reader, would you commit the above Scripture to heart? If you are in a constant fight with fear, meditate on this Scripture and fortify your heart with this promise. Whether you find yourself besieged by debts, attacked by what doctors call a terminal illness, or constantly anxious over the safety of your children, remember this powerful verse. The God of angelic armies is with you. No weapon formed against you shall prosper (see Isaiah 54:17)! (Quote source here.)

In this last article published on July 28, 2018 titled, The Prophet Elisha and an Army of Angels,” by Whitney Hopler, Communications Director for the Center for Advancement of Well Being at George Mason University, she writes:

In the book of Kings (2 Kings 6), the Bible describes how God provides an army of angels leading horses and chariots of fire to protect the prophet Elisha and his servant and opens the servant’s eyes so that he can see the angelic army surrounding them.

An Earthly Army Tries to Capture Them

Ancient Aram (now Syria) was at war with Israel, and the king of Aram was disturbed that the prophet Elisha was able to predict where Aram’s army was planning to go, warning Israel’s king so that he could devise Israel’s army’s strategy. Aram’s king decided to send a large group of soldiers to the city of Dothan to capture Elisha so that he wouldn’t be able to help Israel win the war.

Verses 14 to 15 describe what happens next: “Then he sent horses and chariots and a strong force there. They went by night and surrounded the city. When the servant of the man of God got up and went out early the next morning, an army with horses and chariots had surrounded the city. ‘Oh no, my lord! What shall we do?’ the servant asked.”

Being surrounded by a large army with no escape terrified the servant, who at this point could see only the earthly army there to capture Elisha.

A Heavenly Army Appears for Protection

The story continues in verses 16 and 17: “‘Don’t be afraid,’ the prophet answered. ‘Those who are with us are more than those who are with them.’ And Elisha prayed, ‘Open his eyes, Lord, so that he may see.’ Then the Lord opened the servant’s eyes, and he looked and saw the hills full of horses and chariots of fire all around Elisha.”

Bible scholars believe that angels were in charge of the horses and chariots of fire on the surrounding hills, ready to protect Elisha and his servant. Through Elisha’s prayer, his servant gained the ability to see not just the physical dimension but also the spiritual dimension, including the angelic army.

Verses 18 and 19 then record, “As the enemy came down toward him, Elisha prayed to the lord, ‘Strike this army with blindness.’ So he struck them with blindness, as Elisha had asked. Elisha told them, ‘This is not the road and this is not the city. Follow me, and I will lead you to the man you are looking for.’ And he led them to Samaria.”

Elisha Shows Mercy to the Enemy

Verse 20 describes Elisha praying for the soldiers’ sight to be restored once they entered the city, and God answered that prayer, so they could finally see Elisha—and also the king of Israel, who was with him. Verses 21 to 23 describe Elisha and the king showing mercy to the army, holding a feast for the soldiers to build friendship between Israel and Aram. Verse 23 ends by saying, “The bands from Aram stopped raiding Israel’s territory.”

In this passage, God responds to prayer by opening people’s eyes both spiritually and physically, in whatever ways are most useful for their growth. (Quote source here.)

Inspiring, isn’t it? I hope it has inspired you as much as it inspired me while searching for articles to include in this post. And, never forget about that invisible army that is all around us, and be encouraged!

I’ll end this post with the words from Joshua 1:9: Have I not commanded you? Be strong and courageous. Do not be afraid; do not be discouraged . . .

For the Lord your God . . .

Will be with you . . .

Wherever you go . . . .

YouTube Video: “Revelation Song” by Phillips, Craig and Dean:

Photo #1 credit here
Photo #2 credit here

3 thoughts on “An Invisible Army

    • I mentioned it as it was mentioned in the “Our Daily Bread” devotion I quoted, and I did enjoy reading the Chronicles of Narnia back in 1998 (my favorite book of the seven-volume set is “The Horse and His Boy”). You used the word “interesting,” but that word can mean either pro or con. It’s been 22 years since I read the Chronicles so I don’t remember much about it now.

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